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Ford Lile - Track Of The Scarab (Love Lyrics Of The Ages: Paeans From The Age Of Tutankhamun And Words From The Songs Of Solomon) album flac

Ford Lile - Track Of The Scarab (Love Lyrics Of The Ages: Paeans From The Age Of Tutankhamun And Words From The Songs Of Solomon) album flac Performer: Ford Lile
Title: Track Of The Scarab (Love Lyrics Of The Ages: Paeans From The Age Of Tutankhamun And Words From The Songs Of Solomon)
Style: Leftfield, Spoken Word, Abstract, Poetry, New Age, Special Effects, Ambient, Disco
Released: 1978
Country: US
MP3 album: 1174 mb
FLAC album: 1230 mb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: MPC AU TTA WMA AUD DMF MP3
Genre: Electronic / Not albums

This album was released on the label Pennant Records (catalog number S-900) Pennant Records (catalog number 900 + 1) Pennant Records (catalog number PRLP 900+1). This album was released in 1978 year. B. Ford Lile - Songs From The Book Of Solomon mp3. mp3 Player. Music video: Watch now Ford Lile's video clip of album "Track Of The Scarab (Love Lyrics Of The Ages: Paeans From The Age Of Tutankhamun And Words From The Songs Of Solomon)". Who Said It's Christmas (In San Francisco), Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas.

Though the album subtitle gives it as "Words From The Songs Of Solomon", side B on the center label says "Songs From The Book Of Solomon". This album was recorded in: Cairo, Egypt (The City of the Dead); Giza, Egypt; London, England, Hollywood, Caifornia, . Liner notes written by Kay Fayr, Ford Lile's secretary for over twelve years as of 1978. SSS Subliminal Sound Stereo

Crawling through the burning sand Just a man who's lost in time (lost in time) Distant memories of a life That flow like waves within my mind. Look upon these calloused hands As they move without a thought Lucid wisdom in every atom The golden mind of Thoth. We are the gods who have lost ourselves in forms Like a scarab in the mind we fester in the soul I have felt the burden of pain For the last time. You want the fucking truth? So you want the fucking truth?

The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon or Canticles (Hebrew: שִׁיר הַשִּׁירִים Šîr HaŠŠîrîm, Greek and Ancient Greek: Ἆισμα Ἀισμάτων, romanized: Âisma Āismátōn; Latin: Canticum Canticorum), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim (or "Writings"), and a book of the Old Testament

Tutankhamun became king at about the age of 9. He probably got a lot of help from Ay, his vizier (minister of state) who also became his successor. Historians believe Tutankhamun died at about the age of 18, but they are unsure how. X-rays show that he may have had a head injury from an accident. Some say that he was murdered. Officially it is thought he died from an infection after breaking his leg. His tomb is in the Valley of the Kings in central Egypt.

As the song ends, both the husband and wife are confident and secure in their love, they sing of the lasting nature of true love, and they yearn to be in each other’s presence. Foreshadowings: Some Bible interpreters see in Song of Solomon an exact symbolic representation of Christ and His church. Christ is seen as the king, while the church is represented by the Shulamite. While we believe the book should be understood literally as a depiction of marriage, there are some elements that foreshadow the Church and her relationship with her king, the Lord Jesus

The Song of Solomon (also known as the Song of Songs) celebrates human love: the union in which a man and a woman become on. In the book of Genesis, when God made Adam and Eve, He brought them together as husband and wife. Adam recognized Eve as bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh. For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh. The Song of Solomon (also known as the Song of Songs) celebrates this kind of union: a man and a woman becoming one. It’s a ballad of love and longing. It’s an exchange of love notes. It’s a story of adoration, satisfaction, delight, and sexual desire. It’s the tale of a young woman preparing to marry.

The first interpretation seems unlikely when one recognizes that the young woman’s beloved is shepherding his flock in contrast from the king. The shepherd and the king are in different places. When the beloved woman is in the presence of the king, Song of Songs 1:7 depicts, Tell me, O you whom I love, Where you feed your flock, Where you make it rest at noon. For why should I be as one who veils herself By the flocks of your companions? The Shulamite woman is thinking about her beloved who is not the king. Solomon wrote the Song of Songs in a theatrical style. Scholars agree that this song was originally composed for singers to perform before an audience.

Rock of Ages" is a popular Christian hymn written by the Reverend Augustus Toplady in 1763 and first published in The Gospel Magazine in 1775. Traditionally, it is held that Toplady drew his inspiration from an incident in the gorge of Burrington Combe in the Mendip Hills in England. Toplady, a preacher in the nearby village of Blagdon, was travelling along the gorge when he was caught in a storm. Finding shelter in a gap in the gorge, he was struck by the title and scribbled down the initial lyrics.

Tracklist

Track Of The Scarab (Sections 1-6)
Songs From The Book Of Solomon

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
S-900, 900 + 1, PRLP 900+1 Ford Lile Track Of The Scarab (Love Lyrics Of The Ages: Paeans From The Age Of Tutankhamun And Words From The Songs Of Solomon) ‎(LP, Album) Pennant Records, Pennant Records, Pennant Records S-900, 900 + 1, PRLP 900+1 US 1978
PR82781 Ford Lile Track Of The Scarab ‎(CD, Album, RE) Pennant Records PR82781 US 1999
none Ford Lile Track Of The Scarab ‎(5xFile, MP3, Album) The Orchard none Unknown


Comments: (2)
Ranenast
While the CD release of "Track Of The Scarab" has only sections 1 to 5, the original 1978 vinyl album has an additional section not included on the CD wherein Ford makes a sudden transition from moody narrated soundscapes into a sort of nocturnal jazz-disco reprise of the melodies from sections 1 to 5: "These are the sounds of Egypt of antiquity—but there is a pulsating Egypt of today, an egypt of now..." It's a cleanly funky instrumental with some piano soloing. I think it was left off the 1999 CD reissue because having the phrase "Egypt of today, Egypt of now" in there was a bit laughable in 1999 when the funky instrumental sounds so dated. Perhaps it was thought too distracting, not serious enough. Just a guess! Oh, also the LP has the second side, "Songs From The Book Of Solomon" (or "Words From The Song Of Solomon" as the album subtitle says.)
Dammy
Bizarre and amazing outsider art. This is an eerie, evocative little storytelling, placing us in a chamber of a pyramid. Ford paints a sonic picture of creepy nocturnal darkness and hypnotic, sensual (sexual? pretty much) suggestion to an unnamed, seemingly present woman. The music creeps about cinematically, soft chimes and textures, sound effects, like it was written for a "mysteries of the unknown" TV program. It doesn't do a lot of changing, though, over the course of this short "album". Ford's voice has the self-confident intonation of a hypnotist or casanova, draping odd sentence after odd sentence around the listener like ribbons. More later when I've had time to absorb it fully. This is some strange and fantastic stuff. EDIT: This CD version is missing the funky instrumental "Section 6" at the end of the 1978 LP. Also missing is side B of the LP, "Songs From The Book Of Solomon".