world.thomson-multimedia
» » Prince Buster - Al Capone

Prince Buster - Al Capone album flac

Prince Buster - Al Capone album flac Performer: Prince Buster
Title: Al Capone
Style: Ska, Rocksteady
Released: 1987
MP3 album: 1458 mb
FLAC album: 1646 mb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: MP3 VOX MOD TTA ADX MP1 AAC
Genre: Reggae

Al Capone" is a song and single by Jamaican singer-songwriter Prince Buster. It was first released in 1964. At the time it was written many Jamaicans had a fascination with films from Hollywood, particularly gangster and Western films. Al Capone, the American gangster from the 1920s and 1930s, held a particular interest for Jamaican listeners. Primarily an instrumental, the song starts with the sound of a car crash, gun fire and squealing tyres.

Cecil Bustamente Campbell OD (24 May 1938 – 8 September 2016), known professionally as Prince Buster, was a Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer. The records he released in the 1960s influenced and shaped the course of Jamaican contemporary music and created a legacy of work that would be drawn upon later by reggae and ska artists. Cecil Bustamente Campbell was born in Orange Street in Kingston, Jamaica, on 24 May 1938.

On this page you can listen to mp3 music free or download album or mp3 track to your PC, phone or tablet. And you can download the album in one file to your computer or tablet or phone. Attention! All audio material is presented solely for information. All styles of audio music.

Prince Buster - Al Capone. Download MP3. Prince Buster.

The mighty Prince Buster shot his way into the . chart for the first time with "Al Capone" in 1967, and it would take 21 years to follow up that success, when a recut of his rude reggae fave "Whine & Grine" finally pushed the Jamaican legend back into the Top 50 in 1988. Obviously, this paltry chart showing in no way mirrored the true impact that the Prince had on the island, but does accurately reflect the prejudice that Jamaican artists and their records faced, a criminal negligence ensuring that their singles went unspun on radio and uncounted at specialty shops.